Ready to take on Governor Snyder's math test?






Let’s see if you can beat Governor Snyder
on this simple 5 question math test!

Question 1 of 5

In his first year in office, Governor Snyder cut funding to our K-12 schools by $470 per pupil. He increased it by $30 the following year and is proposing a $100 increase this year.

-$470 + $30 + $100 =

Let’s see if you can beat Governor Snyder
on this simple 5 question math test!

Question 2 of 5

When Governor Snyder took office, the State of Michigan was investing $1.58 billion in our public universities and community colleges. This year, the State of Michigan is investing $1.43 billion in our public universities and community colleges. That means Governor Snyder has:

Let’s see if you can beat Governor Snyder
on this simple 5 question math test!

Question 3 of 5

In his first year in office, Governor Snyder diverted $396 million away from the state’s School Aid Fund to pay for corporate tax handouts. In his second year, he diverted $398 million away and in his third year he took another $398 million. How much money has he handed out to corporations that was supposed to go to our schools?

Let’s see if you can beat Governor Snyder
on this simple 5 question math test!

Question 4 of 5

If there were 31 school districts facing financial emergencies when Governor Snyder took office and 55 today, that means we now have:

Let’s see if you can beat Governor Snyder
on this simple 5 question math test!

Question 5 of 5

Overall, if Governor Snyder cut school funding by $930,663,300 and diverted an additional $1,192,459,600 out of the School Aid Fund, how has the funding for Michigan’s public schools changed since he took office?

Well done! You beat Governor Snyder’s Math Test.

You scored: 5 out of 5
Governor Snyder scored: 0 out of 5

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In his first year in office, Governor Snyder cut funding to our K-12 schools by $470 per pupil. He increased it by $30 the following year and is proposing a $100 increase this year. -$470 + $30 + $100 =

A) -$340
B) $660

That’s right!

Even with the Governor’s proposed $100 increase this year, we’ll still be funding our schools $340 per pupil LESS than we were when he took office.

Governor Snyder answered: B) $660

The Governor had some problems with this question because he’s claiming he increased per pupil funding by $660 and called it a “huge investment in K-12 education.” Sorry, Governor. Those numbers don’t add up.

When Governor Snyder took office, the State of Michigan was investing $1.58 billion in our public universities and community colleges. This year, the State of Michigan is investing $1.43 billion in our public universities and community colleges. That means Governor Snyder has:

A) Increased funding for higher education by $150 million
B) Decreased funding for higher education by $150 million
C) Ignored the advice of economists, educators & business leaders

Correct!

While countless advocates have said Michigan must make a significant investment in higher education to lure job providers to our state, Governor Snyder’s proposed budget for 2014 would still leave us significantly below the funding levels from when he took office.

Governor Snyder answered: A) Increased funding for higher education by $150 million

Sorry again, Governor Snyder. Your budgets have only allowed college tuition costs to become more and more unaffordable for students across Michigan.

In his first year in office, Governor Snyder diverted $396 million away from the state’s School Aid Fund to pay for corporate tax handouts. In his second year, he diverted $398 million away and in his third year he took another $398 million. How much money has he handed out to corporations that was supposed to go to our schools?

A) $1.19 billion
B) $0
C) Who cares?

Correct!

Governor Snyder has diverted nearly $1.2 billion out of the School Aid Fund, money that we were promised would only be spent on public education.

Governor Snyder answered: C) Who cares?

Governor Snyder sure didn’t like this question. He harshly told reporters that “I would suggest (critics) go read the Michigan Constitution…There's nothing really to talk about here." We’re guessing Michigan students and parents would still like to talk with you about it, Governor.

If there were 31 school districts facing financial emergencies when Governor Snyder took office and 55 today, that means we now have:

A) More schools in deficit
B) Less schools in deficit
C) Relentless Positive Action

Correct!

More and more schools have fallen into financial emergencies under Governor Snyder’s watch and 2 school districts were dissolved completely. This really isn’t sounding like a “huge investment in K-12 education” is it?

Governor Snyder answered: C) Relentless Positive Action

This question was supposed to only have 2 answers, but when Governor Snyder answered it, he’d only say that he’s focused on his agenda of “relentless positive action.” We still don’t really know what that means, but it sure hasn’t helped our schools, students or teachers.

Overall, if Governor Snyder cut school funding by $930,663,300 and diverted an additional $1,192,459,600 out of the School Aid Fund, how has the funding for Michigan’s public schools changed since he took office?

A) Governor Snyder has increased school funding by over $1 billion
B) Governor Snyder has cut school funding by over $2 billion
C) Governor Snyder is hoping you weren’t paying attention for the past 4 years.

Correct!

The reality is that Governor Snyder has cut more than $2 billion from our K-12 schools and apparently is just hoping we’ll all forget that happened.

Governor Snyder answered: A) Governor Snyder has increased school funding by over $1 billion

Believe it or not, Governor Snyder is actually claiming he’s increased school funding by over $1 billion. His math isn’t just wrong, it’s offensive.

Submit your Story

While Snyder and legislative Republicans continue to ignore the complaints of real teachers, parents and students who have been hurt by their cuts to education funding kids and adults alike are encouraged to share their story of how Republican school cuts have affected them. Please share your personal story through text or a YouTube video link below.